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Screening Memory

What is memory, if not walking in the past? Walking in a metaphorical way, a memorial one. Memory can thrive in time and help fashion a becoming based on the experience of the past (Del Fiol’s The Space In-Between). Cinema becomes a fertile terrain for an atemporal meeting (Torossian’s Girl from Moush). It gathers together several spaces and temporalities and opens a contemporary dialogue with history while taking part of it. Thus, a film becomes an essential component in the construction of collective memory, especially in attaining or creating an individual experience (Paradjanov’s The Color of Pomegranates).


We live in a time when experience through the moving image is essential, although we know the precariousness of film representation and its limitations. Cinema orders our memories and establishes a physical referent in time. Memory without time does not exist (Tarkovsky’s Nostalghia). The act of tracing and revealing their memories compels subjects to get in touch with the already forgotten (frustrations) or with what they seek to forget (Malick’s The Tree of Life). The filmmaker’s rethinking history influences memory and its path (Akerman’s No Home Movie). This constant rethinking process produces a new discourse about the past and opens a critical and judicious window on what happened and what has been written in the annals of official history.

The Centre for Memory and Testimony Studies proposes through this film series to see, to discuss, and to explore these various cinematic memory-scapes, which screen as much as reveal our modes of recollection.

Hudson Moura, programmer
Assistant Professor
Politics and Public Administration
Ryerson University